BREAKING THE CONSENSUS: THE POLITICISATION OF MAORI AFFAIRS

Keith Barber

Abstract


This article takes issue with the claim made by Tremewan (2005a) that the
New Zealand social sciences have been uncritical of neotraditionalist and
culturalist trends in social policy. It points out that at least since the 1980s
there has existed a significant body of social science literature critical of these trends. The article also takes issue with Tremewan’s attribution of increased political dissent in the area of Maori affairs to the culturalist ideological currents dominating social policy. The article provides an alternative explanation for this increase in political dissent by focusing upon the material conditions of existence and the opportunism of power-seeking politicians.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11157/sites-vol3iss1id37